Season of Goodbyes

Thank you, all, for your prayers on our behalf.

They say with raising children, “The days are long but the years are short.” We are feeling that as we raise our beautiful girls in the midst of orienting ourselves to culture in Rwanda and spending a sizeable portion of each day on language learning.

East Africa Spiritual Life Conference

IMG_1607For a week in early April, our team joined other World Venture missionaries from Uganda, Tanzania, and Kenya for this conference in Mombasa, Kenya. We had a great time of prayer and spiritual rejuvenation with a preaching team from Denver Community Church, and the 3-12 year olds had a special team come out from Peoria to run a Vacation Bible School.

One highlight for us adults was the “first termer’s” debrief. We connected with about 8 other families who were in their first term as missionaries in Africa. We rejoiced that others understood our struggles from personal experience, and we heard stories of rejection, disappointment, fear and loss as well as joy, friendship, and “baby step” successes that illustrate the path that is before us in this first term.

Building Relationships in a Climate of Distrust

In a conversation with an embassy employee, he said, “I’ve lived in 7 different countries and always make it a point to hang out with nationals. And I’ve made life long friendships in every country…except Rwanda.” An Asian professional who has lived in 9 countries said, “More than any other country, I am amazed at how little trust there is in Rwanda between people.” A missionary veteran, “Even the Rwandans know that this systemic distrust of others, even in marriage, is a stronghold; it is a harmful aspect of their culture.” We have heard this confirmed by several Rwandans.

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Playing soccer at the Pastoral Training School: pastors, teachers, missionaries and their kids.

It can be daunting to think of this climate of so much distrust and think about building relationships and doing ministry. As we serve in this context, pray that we meet the right people, leaders able to be change agents who point Rwandans to Christ and the power of his resurrection.

 Season of Good-byes

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Janzens

This month we say goodbye to two teammate families. The Janzens are “visiting” the US for a year of “home assignment.” We are thankful it will only be a year without them, a much bigger sting for us is that on July 5th we will say goodbye to another family from our team, the Scheers. This family, who put Rwanda on our radar 6 years ago and hosted us in this country 5 years ago, has served in Rwanda since 1979. They were instrumental in starting New Creation Ministries. And now they are moving back to the US and retiring from full-time missionary service. Many in Rwanda will mourn the loss of the Scheers, their understanding of the culture and language, their experience as teachers and missionaries, their friendship and proximity. We will miss them as neighbors, mentors, and friends. In the classroom, Gary has left big shoes to fill.

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Scheers

Four Months

We have been here for four months! Other long termers have noted that the 4-6 months is usually the most difficult. These last 6 weeks have indeed been hard:

Returning from Mombasa, Grace developed full body hives, which recurred 3 days later, worse, while on antihistamines.

After 6 doctor visits and a blood draw allergy test, we still conjecture Grace has and allergy to some form of mango and/or pineapple products.

We determined that we will need to do a skin allergy test in either Kenya or South Africa to determine the true cause.

Also, we caught “the Africa Cold,” as a family and as a team. Several team mates’ kids were sick, Grace got sick, passed it to me and Rayna, and then Krystal. Grace got the worst of it, in bed for four days with a fever and body aches. Rayna, thankfully, was only mildly feverish for two days. Even three weeks later, we all have the signature lingering cough.

Noella and Shadow

Since our last update we have added a second dogs to our household. We are quite pleased with our dogs. Noella has turned out to be a good mouser, killing two rats and a mole/shrew in the last three months.  And two mice in the kitchen this week.

IMG_1659We got a second dog, initially named Lovey, but we renamed her Shadow. Shadow isn’t a barker, but she does bark at things that climb over the wall!  Shadow is a great name for her, because she is always underfoot. Another curiosity, in Kinyarwanda, Shadow is igicucu (iggy-chewchew); but igicucu (iggy-choochoo) means idiot.

Special Week/end

This week we were blessed to host our friend from Colorado and fellow East Africa missionary, Melissa. She has been serving at a Christian school in Gulu, Uganda, for several years, the last two as its director. Since she is one of the few missionaries to be “sent” by Scum of the Earth Church, our church in Denver, we decided to call this reunion our East Africa Scum Missionary Conference.

IMG_4403This weekend, while Melissa climbs an active volcano, our family gets to travel to the south west corner of Rwanda to visit the home of our language helper, Philemon. We are excited to take this step in friendship with him, see places special to him, meet and stay with his family, and to preach at his brother’s church. I will preach in English, and Philemon will preach in Kinyarwanda. Pray that the message of the Gospel will reach and transform lives. Pray also that our children will stay healthy and enjoy visiting, “Philemon’s world.”

Screen Shot 2016-03-29 at 8.52.44 PMStay tuned, as Krystal soon shares about several opportunities she has had to practice nursing here.

Thank you for your continued prayer and financial support!

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Christ is Risen!

Thank you for your continued prayers for us. We have had a busy two months, and it won’t let up until mid-April.

Language

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This is our primary job right now. We have a language tutor, Philemon, come to our house every weekday for two hours to work with us. Then, we take what we have learned and apply it, in our neighborhood, on walks, at church and in the market. It can be super empowering to actually have a conversation with a Rwandan. The look on their faces is priceless when we speak Kinyarwanda to a stranger. They are amazed, and so eager to help us learn more. Although, most of the time, their help is unintelligible because our vocabulary is still meager.

Church

We have set down roots in a Rwandan Church. The service is 98% in Kinyarwanda, and every so often, they sing a song in both Kinyarwanda and English. Sometimes a helpful Rwandan will sit next to us and translate the sermon, but most of the time it is us trying to catch words that we know. However, every now and then, during worship, we catch enough to enter in to worship with our Rwandan brothers and sisters and feel our souls restored, and we begin to feel at home. The church service is about 4 hours long and has not children’s church, if kids come to church they are expected to sit quietly through the service. About two to three hours into the church service Grace and Krystal migrate outside with the other children and color or play games.

Meanwhile, we are listening to podcasts of sermons to get fed.

Team

We were staying in the house of our friends, Greg and Tori Finley. When they came back to Rwanda, it was to say good-bye and sell their things. This was a hard good-bye for us, as we had really connected with them in the US and when we visited Rwanda four years ago.

IMG_1472When they returned, we moved in with Gary and Barbara Bennett. We ended up staying with them for three weeks because after the Finleys left, we had walls recemented and repainted (a repair is needed about every four years here). What a bittersweet time of saying goodbye, and living in community with some of the sweetest people. We are blessed to join the Bennetts on this team ministering in Rwanda.

While we were there, they had a team from Fargo, ND, come and help build desks and chairs for our second CLIR classroom. The workshop was in the Bennetts’ yard, so we did language study with lots of background noise, but also got to know this sweet team so much better.

Through it all, our team has been very supportive and encouraging. We’ve surprised them with our resilience and independence.

This week I (Nick) am attending the Shepherd Leadership Conference, a pastor’s conference sponsored by New Creation Ministries. On Saturday, we fly to Kenya for World Venture’s East Africa Spiritual Life Conference, an every three year event. None of this is impossibly hard, and Kenya promises to be quite fun, but life is very draining. Pray for health and safe travels.

Culture

IMG_0743Our colleague, Gary Scheer, a 30+ year missionary in Rwanda, has been meeting with a few of us to give us insights into Rwandan culture. He has said, “In Rwanda, some things look different, and some things look the same, but actually EVERYTHING is different.” How families work, what friendship looks like, expectations of employers and employees, hopes for life, everything. Because everything is different, normal daily activities take so much more energy.

One interesting part of culture, people offer hospitality by coming to visit you rather than inviting you into their home. You never know when a visitor will show up.

Grace

IMG_0010In the market, it is not unusual for a complete stranger to grab Grace and give her a hug. Everyone wants to touch her beautiful blonde hair. God blessed us with a resilient kid. Even though she is shy of this attention at first, as we establish proper boundaries with these strangers, and as we interact with her and Rwandans, she opens up and is able to interact.

We were blessed to find an affordable preschool for Grace to learn while we focus on language study. She learns to read, write, count and play in a multi-cultural environment from Kenyan teachers. They have a snack time and serve lunch before we pick her up. Every day, her teachers write two or three sentences in a little book to let us know how Grace is doing.

After a month of school, Grace came to us and said, “Can I bring a snack to school?” “No. They give you a snack.” “But all the other kids bring snack from home.” “Not today, but I’ll talk to your teacher,” we conceded. Apparently, snack time is optional, and only if parents provide snacks for their own kids. The teachers told us that with many classes only a few kids have snacks, but in this class we are the ONLY family who does not send a snack. Her teacher informed us, “All the other kids have snacks, so I tell Grace to go to her backpack and drink from her water bottle so she will not feel sad. But sometimes even her bottle is empty of water. If you could even send a carrot, she would be happy.” Yes, we moved to Africa, and OUR kid is the one without food and water. The irony is not lost on us.

Rayna

20160315_141257_resizedIn the last month, she has taken leaps developmentally, meeting some of the usual milestones we look for. She loves to be talked to and she babbles back. She laughs when Grace sings to her and when she can kick the mosquito net. She is pushing down with her legs, responds to her name. And in the last few days she has started purposefully grabbing things and rolling from back-to-front. We thought that Grace was an easy baby, and feel extremely blessed God gave us another one. She has been so flexible, and doesn’t mind others holding her; since women love to pass her around at church. The only draw back is that it has been super hot and that full head of hair has been like a winter hat on her head.

Noella Anesti

10549981_10204205340189941_6531066651760752849_oWe adopted a dog!  A family leaving for the US gave us their dog.  They got her on Christmas and named her Noella.  We got her on Easter and named her Anesti.

Again, we are blessed to have you as part of our sustaining team.  We are blessed by your sacrifices of prayer and finances to enable our work here.

 

 

Here!

Thank you all for your prayers, and keep praying.

We arrived safely on Thursday January 21, with most of our bags. Five bags, including our desktop computer, did not make our crazy 35 minute plane transfer in Doha. Gate A9 to Gate E25 (the exact opposite end of the airport!)

Doha

Doha airport is so beautiful, and bigger than this map lets on.

Fortunately they arrived on the next flight, the next day, intact.

Upon our arrival, while I was waiting to fill out missing baggage papers, Krystal and Grace peaked around the corner and saw our entire team waiting for us. The kids had all skipped the end of school to meet us (especially Grace).  What a great team! (Pictures to follow.)

Sleep

Krystal and I were exhausted and settled ourselves into our new normal sleep pattern: 9PM-5AM. Grace, however, had slept on the plane and wanted to nap 10PM-1AM and then be awake. She’s had a tough sleep adjustment.  Rayna adjusted pretty quickly, but Sunday night was the first night she slept through the night; given, we did stay up until crazy late: 10:30 PM.  As of Monday, Grace has slept through the night, alone, in her own bed for three nights! Hallelujah!

The joke here is that 8PM is “missionary midnight,” but after a day of negotiating a new culture in unfamiliar weather, terrain, driving, language, etc., going to bed early just makes sense. Also, there is no TV to speak of, and streaming videos is both too expensive (paying for data by the megabyte) and too unreliable (our router says 4G LTE, but drops its signal frequently).  I’ve tried to upload this letter for about three days!

Home

We were able to ship many of our household items from the US to Rwanda, and they are set to arrive about March 20. Until then, we are living in a borrowed house with borrowed furniture. Praise God that we did bring our toothbrushes, pillows, computers and clothes on the plane.  We can make it work, but each of us wants to “nest” in our own way, and we can’t do that until we have our own place.  After living with Krystal’s mom for two years (a blessing in so many ways), we are READY for our own place. (Pictures to follow.)

On the other hand, every time we come back to the US on home assignment we’ll feel like we’re in borrowed space.  This is just another in a long list of little things that remind us that this world is not our home.

Over the last few days we’ve been learning to drive, find our way around the city, scoping out places to buy daily food (bananas, milk), our core fruits and veggies, the odd prepared items, and cheap Chinese (BPA/Lead included) products.

Also, we were able to go to a 4 hour service in Kinyarwanda!  Three sermons were hard, but the music was great.  They did praise choruses; by the thirteenth time through, we were able to sing along!

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This was the offertory.  Those baskets are traditional “gift boxes.”  How cool that they are used for gifts to God!

The Pastors

Our team leader, Tim Brubaker, gives this report from our Pastoral Training School:

“We have 20 new pastors studying in our Pastoral Training School. We are two-thirds done with their first term, studying “The True Gospel” (with me) and “The Christian Life” (with Joseph). These courses require a major realignment of perspective and previous understanding. Pray for these guys!! Consider some of the men that we have been teaching these weeks:

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  • One has been utilizing strange spiritual powers to heal sicknesses. These powers were given to him before he became a Christian and have continued with random visitations from a spirit. He is praying that the Lord will release him from these things if they are not from him. (We are too!)
  • One is a 27-year-old widower. His wife died two years ago, possibly from poison. He leads his local congregation while caring for his 
three-year-old son. His eyes well up with tears when he talks about his wife.
  • One is becoming more aware throughout these courses that his adult son has possibly 
joined a cult. This morning we were praying together; his eyes were full of tears.
  • One is realizing for the first time in his life that being the son of a pastor is insufficient to 
save him. When I asked him to share his testimony, he said he only has his father’s
  • One is a newer Christian, having been saved out of Islam. Although he has given his life to 
Christ, he is becoming increasingly burdened for his son who is still in Islam. He is planning 
to visit his son shortly after this term to share the Gospel with him.
  • One is an older man who came out of paganism many years ago. Although he clearly loves the Lord, he is very nervous about studying. He only finished two years of primary school 
and his wife is illiterate. He is not sure how he will make it through our program.

These are the men who will be catalysts for change in their local churches. As you pray for these men, pray also for the provision of additional financial sponsors to help underwrite their studies. (If you are interested, let us know, and we will send information.)”

Update: At a group prayer time, five pastors stood up to confess Christ as their savior for the first time.  After an interview with each, Tim discerned that two of them just had issues with sin in their life, but three of these pastors received salvation this week.  Amazing!  Click here for more information via Tim’s update.

Our First Work

On Tuesday, Grace started Preschool and on Wednesday, Krystal and I began with our first work: language learning. We start together with our language tutor, Philemon. We are excited to have words. We are extremely discontent with our limited vocabulary and know that these next few weeks will be hard but very good and rewarding. Pray that Krystal and I will get into a workable pattern of life to study, learn together, and practice while caring for Grace and Rayna.

Again, thank you so much for praying for us.  We’ve been blessed and amazed at God’s hand on us in this transition to Rwanda.  We are FINALLY HERE!  Now to work!

Introducing Rayna Sparrow

On November 9, 2015, at 7:21 AM, Krystal gave birth to our second daughter, coming into this world at 8lbs 8oz, and 22in long.

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The Story of Her Name

We have had many people ask us about how we chose to name her Rayna Sparrow. As a background, the past three years have not been easy and more specifically, this pregnancy has not been easy. From the time we were appointed to be missionaries to Rwanda to now, we feel like we have been on a difficult journey of transition, change of identity, and preparing to get to Rwanda. During this time, we feel like we have had many joys, answers to prayers, times of questioning, disappointments, trials of faith and learning to trust in God’s perfect timing.

One of these trials and disappointments was the time it took to actually get pregnant with Rayna. Call me (Krystal) crazy, but having grown up with a sister close to my age, I had always hoped to have my kids close together and really wanted to have our second child shortly after having Grace. This, however, did not happen. In fact, it took much longer to get pregnant than I expected and along the way there were some serious times of disappointment and heartbreak. Nearing our expected departure to Rwanda, I began to think it would be a good idea for us to wait until we arrived in Rwanda before we continued to try for baby number two. However, I was shocked when 9 months out from our expected departure date I learned I was pregnant!

While we were thrilled to learn we were expecting a new baby, this has not been an easy pregnancy. We spent the first half with concerns about a miscarriage and the last part with serious concerns about preeclampsia and preterm delivery. Additionally, because of my diagnosis with preeclampsia we had to delay our departure date and I had to stop working as a labor and delivery nurse, an occupation I love.

bird landing

Yet, God has been with us. Early on, in this pregnancy God comforted us with the verse Matthew 10:29-31:

Are not two sparrows sold for a penny? Yet not one of them will fall to the ground outside your Father’s care. And even the very hairs of your head are all numbered. So don’t be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.

She is our Sparrow, and throughout our pregnancy and especially in taking her to Rwanda we must trust God to care for her.

Later, as we were looking at names, Krystal looked up the Hebrew meaning of Rayna: pure and song of the Lord. We liked the name, but we weren’t compelled by the meanings. We weren’t sure how “purity” fit the journey we have been on to being blessed with her or if it fit who we hoped she would become. The same morning I had looked up the meaning of Rayna and was praying over what we should name her, we went to church and heard a sermon that gave a whole new meaning to her name.

mark 6The sermon that day was on Mark 6:45-52 where Jesus walks on water. The sermon however, talked about how Jesus sent the disciples out on a boat into a storm and sat on the hillside watching them as they struggled against the wind all night. The main point of the sermon was that sometimes the Lord places us in the middle of storms on purpose and allows us to struggle so that we maybe purified for his glory. The pastor used the illustration of a silversmith purifying silver.

When a silversmith is purifying sliver he places the metal into a hot fire where it is melted until the impurities are separated from the pure metal. When a silversmith was asked how they knew when the silver was pure and should be pulled out of the fire, he answered, “I know it ready when I can see the reflection of my face in it.”

[It’s great sermon.  Check it out: Sent Into the Storm]

As we reflected on the journey God has brought us on thus far and the journey that we will walk once we arrive in Rwanda, we can see how there are times of trials, disappointments, suffering and hardships. However, we also know that God watches over us. In the midst of trials, we can trust him to be watching. We can know that he has put us into the crucible to be refined, that we might finally reflect his image and for that we are grateful. May our Rayna, also, reflect the image of Christ as pure silver.

 

Learning to Abide

God has been reminding me again that one reason he had us stay was to take some dedicated time to draw close to him.  Both of us can see how this will give us a greater spiritual reserve to minister in Rwanda. Grace got a story handout at Sunday School recently and I was reading it to her this morning. In the story, beginning in Luke 10:38, Martha was busy getting things done while Mary was sitting and listening to Jesus. When Martha complained, Jesus replied that Mary had chosen the “better” set of actions.

Jesus Visits Friends

Jesus Visits Friends

For many of us,  sitting at the feet of our Lord does not come naturally. However, this seems to be a common theme in both of our quiet times with the Lord. Recently, I (Nick) was meditating on the passage where people have been invited to the wedding banquet but no one shows up (Luke 15). They are invited again to come, but choose to pursue business and the busyness of life rather than to celebrate at a banquet. God seems to be preparing us that it isn’t just about doing the Lord’s work but also setting work aside for time dedicated to resting at his feet, enjoying his presence and abiding.

Jesus invites us into his presence, to cease our business for an important time of celebration and learning with him. He says,

I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing. John 15:5

I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing. John 15:5

I know I sound like a skipping record, but again and again God brings up this lesson.  Would you pray for us that we would learn what he would have us learn, and become the people he is molding us into?

Waiting for Baby

Our brave 3 year old on a climbing wall.

Our brave 3 year old on a climbing wall.

As I type this on Wednesday November 4, we are still waiting for our baby girl. Our doctor is so pleased with Krystal’s and baby’s health she does not feel the need to induce Krystal any time soon. We might have to wait as late as November 14 to meet her! This is good news and an answer to prayer, and probably better news as we have plenty of preparations for Rwanda.  We believe that it is because of your prayers that Krystal and baby are doing so well.  Thank You!

In Rwanda

Gary and Laurie Scheer

Gary and Laurie Scheer

Today, our friends and colleagues Gary and Laurie Scheer, after 7 months in the US for medical care, have returned to Rwanda. They are both excited to be back in the swing of things, and our team is grateful to have their friends back, healthy, and to have more hands on deck to help with the ministry. Pray to the Lord of the harvest to send workers!  And in 11 days, Gary teaches one of the final classes for our graduating 4th year PTS students: The Kingdom of God.

Also, for five weeks, our CLIR students will receive instruction from a guest science teacher, Paul Steinmeyer. Pray that he quickly “gets” Rwanda and his students.

Update contact information

If you haven’t done so recently, PLEASE click here or the “update” link at the bottom of our email. It is a multi-step process, but we rely on your prayers and don’t want miss the connection.  With your accurate mailing address, we will send you our Christmas letter.

Financial update

A few of our supporters have had changes in their life situations and have needed to withdraw their commitment to support this ministry financially. We need to get back to 100% to travel to Rwanda. Pray for God to raise up three or four more people to give financially to this ministry.

Last prayers

Pray that:

  • We will be able to accomplish our Rwanda “to do list” before baby comes
  • For the birth of our baby girl -continued health of baby and mom and for the birth as a whole
  • For Grace who has had and will continue to have many big changes coming her way (leaving family, friends and school, becoming a big sister, packing or leaving behind most of her stuff and moving to Rwanda).  Poor girl is sick tonight.
  • God would arrange the perfect plane tickets for us -we are having a hard time finding a time to rebook our donated plane tickets over the holiday season, please pray that tickets would open up for the perfect time
  • That we would continue to use this time to practice abiding and that from that this time would bear fruit both here and in Rwanda

Prayers at Work

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If you understand this chart in its entirety, you are beginning to understand preeclampsia.

We wanted to send out an update to say thank you for praying for us, and thank you for sharing your stories.

Today is the day we had planned to leave for Rwanda.  In our last update, we shared that Krystal’s diagnosis of preeclampsia has delayed our departure until after baby is born in early November. Our prayer was for health for mom and baby, and purpose for this time. God is answering our prayers.

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We met with a specialist, a perinatologist, in Seattle on Wednesday. In conjunction with Krystal’s appointment with our doctor in Port Townsend on Monday, here is what we know. It could have been a false positive test, or it could have been caught very early. It could continue to be really mild. The specialist is very optimistic, because there have been no big changes in the past three weeks, that Krystal will make it to term.

We believe that God has kept this from progressing. Please continue to pray for our health. Krystal wants to go full-term and deliver naturally. We’d love for our GP to deliver baby, but she will only do so if she is on call at the hospital at the time. Will you pray for that for us?

Purpose

A month ago, we thought that God wanted us in Rwanda for the end of the year. Now, we see his hand in keeping us here.

Our field leader in Rwanda, Tim Brubaker, reminded us recently, “When you get here it is going to be less about what you know and more about who you are that makes a difference.” Character is the foundation upon which all knowledge and skill must rest. I wouldn’t say that we are without character, but God is using this time to deepen and broaden who we are to encompass all that he wants to do in us and with us, here and in Rwanda. Krystal, always “doing,” is learning to “be” and rest in God, enjoy Grace, and dig deep with God. I, Nick, will be using some of his time helping his mom downsize in preparation for a move to a smaller home. I will also finish my read through the Bible, and I will explore several spiritual disciplines specifically devoting more time to intercessory prayer. Already, I have felt God moving my heart for several people I know in great need.  God wants us to raise up people to pray for the work in Rwanda, of whom we should be the first.

Alpha_course_logoWe invited a few of our relatives to come to Alpha, out of the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer in Chimacum, WA. Alpha is a “10 week course that explores faith from a fresh perspective.” Our prayer is that this course will open up spiritual conversation throughout the week, too, and that our family will find rest and peace through a personal relationship with Jesus. The first night was good. Pray with us that they come back next week.

Cool Problem

Silas, my translator, and Theogene, a graduate of NCM's PTS

Silas, my translator in 2011, and Theogene, a graduate of NCM’s PTS

It takes just over $600 per year to train a student in the Pastoral Training School (PTS). The students pay $65 per year in fees. We want the students to contribute, but since they are mostly poor rural pastors, we cannot charge them more than this. The PTS has always been greatly sponsored by missionaries involved in the program. As we begin to pass the baton of leadership over to some highly competent and godly Rwandan teachers and administrators, we realize that they will need a new source of support. Would you like to be involved? You can send a pastor through four years of school for $50/month! Click here.

baby_airplane.350w_263h2Flight

Finally, pray that we get the right flight. You might imagine that flying with a newborn and preschooler will be different than with just a preschooler. Pray that baby is healthy to fly, and that we get the perfect seats together.

Blessings,

Nick and Krystal
Grace and Baby Girl Pirolo #2

Amazing News & Hard News

On Friday morning, we received the glorious news that verbal and unexpected commitments have come through and that we have reached 100% of our financial support. We praise God for raising up this team of financial partners. Rejoice with us in this gracious provision!

Hard News

Later that day, we received a call from Krystal’s doctor telling us that Krystal cannot be cleared to fly before the baby is born.  After having a mild increase in her blood pressure, Krystal’s doctor ordered a few more tests. These tests came back positive indicating a diagnosis of preeclampsia. We discussed the diagnosis with our doctor Monday (8/31) and for a third time Krystal’s blood pressure was higher than normal for her, this time fairly significantly. This type of diagnosis definitely takes Krystal out of the “low-risk” category for pregnancy and will prevent us from flying to Rwanda in September, as planned.

You might imagine how this feels. First, a potentially dangerous diagnosis is never welcome, but praise God that, should this turn dangerous, we have excellent medical care available. Second, we are reeling from this change from full speed ahead on September 23 to slowing that train down, praying for a different kind of miracle, and waiting on God and our baby to show us when can go.

The natural question people will ask is when will you go?  It depends.  Krystal is due in early November.  If mom and baby are healthy, and baby is delivered at term, we might be cleared to go in a week or a month, and have the biggest delay be baby’s passport (Christmas in Kigali?).  If baby is born prematurely, she may have lung issues, and we will be delayed longer.

Our hearts ache to get to Rwanda, but God has delayed us for his good purpose, yet, we wait not knowing what this chapter holds. And we don’t know how long this chapter will be, yet we have confidence that the next chapter holds our departure to Rwanda.

Wanted: Prayers!

Before Friday, we thought the limiting factor was financial partners. Now we see that God is pressing us to rally the prayer warriors to intercede on our behalf.

First, again, to God be the glory for answering our prayers to become fully funded. This is a blessing in itself, and while the timing was ironic, it is a blessing to enter into this time of uncertainty without the added stress of support raising. Again, praise him that we did not arrive in Kigali with this potentially fatal condition!

Now, pray with us that God heals Krystal and that she is able to deliver our baby naturally and at term at our local hospital.

PLEASE PRAY

  • Pray for the health of mom and baby.
  • Pray for baby to stay put until at least October 20th (37 weeks)
  • During this time of modified bed-rest for Krystal, pray that we will know how to invest ourselves wisely.

Walk with Us

As our friends and family, as our partners in ministry, you are invited to walk with us.  Please tell us your stories; ask us questions; pass on encouragement.  Our hearts will be made lighter by your company.  And as always, let us know how we can pray for you.

Soli Deo Gloria